feminism, feminist, misogyny, rape, sexism, women, writer

Novelist Louise O’Neill’s “Only Ever Yours” To Appear on Screen

Irish author Louise O’Neill’s novel to be adapted for film and TV

Very excited to hear that author Louise O’Neill is gaining the recognition she so rightly deserves.

Her chilling yet engaging debut “Only Ever Yours” details the tentative pressures placed on women in contemporary society but with the obligatory dysotopian twist… and will soon be adapted for film/TV.

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O’Neill’s text highlights countless feminist issues affecting all women, focusing specifically on young women and teenagers experience of sex, beauty and the need to be desired, wanted and approved by others.

Most frightening (and perhaps accurately) O’Neill’s narrative depicts the competition fostered among and between women from a young age, the lack of sisterhood and friendship this produces, and the overall devastation and isolation as a result.

Meanwhile, O’Neill’s newest novel, “Asking For It” continues to examine the pressures women experience, focusing on the proliferation of rape culture in rural Ireland. Though I have not yet read her newest addition to the shelves, I have little doubt it and any work she produces in the future will continue to endorse the feminist agenda and highlight the misogyny and sexism rampant throughout our society – in rural Ireland or some far-off future…

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abuse, domestic violence, feminism, feminist, literature, misogyny, sexism, violence, women, writer

50 Shades of Gre-garious Domestic Violence

I’ve never read the book.

I’ll own up to that much. “Fifty Shades of Grey” was never going to float my boat; I prefer my porn more consensual…

But, when the badly written smut hit the fan, I was intrigued – decent representations of female sexuality are few and far between in popular fictions – so, as any good scholar would, I did my research and, well…

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I think the examples really speak from themselves; taken straight from the book, they highlight the one-sided, abusive, domineering and controlling relationship fostered between protagonist Ana and the “charming” (please note the quotation marks) Christian…

I read these samples of dialogue back when the text first hit the bestselling lists and, sick to my stomach at this violent, abusive behaviour masquerading as sexual “play” and sado-macho activities, decided that I’d give this disgrace parading as literature a miss. 50 shades simply isn’t for me… and I don’t want to go on a rant against the women who enjoyed the text or the movie – let’s face it, Twilight was pretty popular, so of course 50 Shades would and will continue to dominate the bookshelves for some time to come.

If the release date – Valentine’s Day –  didn’t tip you off, the movie experience has been dubbed the romantic experience of the year. It has experienced one of the biggest box office openings so far this year, is expected to gross billions more and is only the first installment in an eventual trilogy – or, well, being more honest quadrilogy: Hollywood’s bound to make the last book a double feature…

This all links to a continuing and disheartening trend in the dominant and controlling partner as desirable in contemporary fiction and cinema: first Edward Cullen, now the new Edward Cullen in masquerading in fanfiction as a millionaire, FORBS 500 candidate and an even worse tendency to romanticise violence against women, reducing all issues of consent and feminist milestone in the last century to meaningless trifle which will only get in the way of all the “romance” (quotation marks, remember!).

If or if not certain women or men found the movie or literary experience worthwhile and got a few shivers in the process, that’s fine. Censorship has never been my thing; too Third Reich Nazism for me and my liberal values, the important thing for me with this text is the need for awareness. The public who consume Fifty Shades should endeavour not to reproduce its messages.

As with Twilight, we need to ensure women and men are aware of the issues this book presents, the abusive behaviour depicted through a suave and powerful character, the notable and problematic lack of consent in a slave-master relationship. The romanticisation of these texts is dangerous for women, through the consumption of these texts the public relearns the abusive lessons of the past, forgoing all feminist gains, and women become sexual commodities in need of controlling and deserving a good spanking… non-consensual, of course. Through these texts women and men relearn and regurgitate a frightening culture where they are the main commodity to be taken and had.

This is what we need to ensure comes out of the 50 Shades experience:

By all means, go to the cinema, enjoy the book, reread, rewatch, climax even! But understand that this book is a fictional representation of how romantic and intimate relationships should NOT work. This text is an example of a dangerous, abusive and terrifying relationship, it is proof of how a patriarchal structure still influences our minds and the contexts of how our relationships should work.

Moreover, if you respect your partner, it is a blueprint on how NOT to treat them.

literature, philosophy, strenght, writer

Gabriel Garcia Marquez Passes Away

Aged 87, the famed writer and Nobel-Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Maquez has passed from this world.

Writing primarily about the passions of his own ethnic background, Marquez published works depicting Latin-Americans. After accepting the Nobel prize for literature in 1982, Marquez said of his kin:

Source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty, of which this roving and nostalgic Colombian is but one cipher more, singled out by fortune. Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable.

[…]

His flamboyant and melancholy fictional works — among them “Chronicle of a Death Foretold,” ”Love in the Time of Cholera” and “Autumn of the Patriarch” — outsold everything published in Spanish except the Bible.

– Heffington Post.

Known as the most popular writer of magical realism – the mixing of the common and everyday with magical, imaginary and fantastic – Maquez, himself, was somewhat magical and today, truly, the world has lost a piece of that magic.